Year 2: Middle–Romans, Reformers & Revolutionaries

Romans, Reformers, Revolutionaries (courses may be taken in any order)  Syllabus at bottom

 

CREDITS

1              World History (69 c. to 1799 c.)

1              English:  Shakespeare and composition

½            Economics (1st semester)

½            Government (2nd semester)

1              College-prep Speech, Research and Study Skills (optional research paper)

 

WORLD HISTORY

Students love Diana Waring’s approach to world history (A History Revealed) which includes a variety of learning approaches for ALL learning styles!  This is a FUN way to study history!!!

Romans, Reformers, Revolutionaries covers a tumultuous time in history when the Church explodes throughout the world; uncharted regions are explored; distant cultures are united; and religious wars burst into flame. Technology, medicine, philosophy, and art sweep nations into bitter turmoil and proud independence. Through it all, you will see God moving behind the scenes to accomplish His purposes.

 

DISCUSSION FORMAT & PRESENTATIONS

What would you see in the classroom?  Full participation!  Lively students actively sharing their great finds.  They learn from each other.  Students hear their peers!  They catch each other’s energy.  Never a dull moment.  One-by-one, with respect for each other’s opinion without correction by a peer.  Students listen to one another and share what is important to them from their homework.  Group projects occasionally.  Videos occasionally.

🔹multi-faceted
🔹interactive, rapid fire discussion
🔹hands-on project once a month

🔹research an area of interest and presentations once a month

🔹confidence building J

 

STUDENTS  LEARN

10% of what they read

20% of what they hear

30% of what they see

50% of what they see & hear

70% of what they say

90%o of what they say & do

 

Therefore A History Revealed implements a variety of learning approaches!  This curriculum doesn’t just teach history; it includes a focus on timelines, music and art appreciation, architecture, literature, foods, maps, etc. of the time period.  This is important as it enables students to make meaningful connections between these various disciplines and to understand them within their historical context.  Variety makes this a fun course! A History Revealed approach is engaging, active, never a dull moment.  Every 4 weeks, a new time period studied with

Week 1:  Reading, listening to CDs         

Week 2:  Research and Present PowerPoint

Week 3:  Hands-on project or Artistic Expression

Week 4:  Emphasis on Shakespeare, composition (optional: foods of culture studied)

 

SPEECH CREDIT: 

Presentations once a month on an area of interest.  Students get a broad feel for each time period as they sit back and learn from each other’s research.  Using PowerPoint or posters, students share with the class their research and develop confidence in a small classroom setting where what they say matters!  Making their own choices every month for research and a hand-on project or artistic expression (a plethora of ideas in the textbook) makes this course educationally interesting!!

Hands-on project or Artistic Expression once a month:  Some bring recordings of music of the time period; other prefer performing (music, puppetry, drama, journalism, art, etc.).  Others show art (by use of projector) or create their own. Others choose from ideas for journalism, architecture, graphic design, etc.  Others love cooking a food from the culture we’re studying and sharing it with the class.  The list goes on and on.  A History Revealed provides SO many ideas for expression so that students truly get a hands-on, multi-sensory educational experience.  Coming from so many angles makes learning stick. Actively involved, students learn best by doing and speaking

 STUDY SKILLS:  Students become comfortable with annotating and Cornell note-taking

 

 

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION COURSE CONTENT (*Shakespeare: see options below)

The AP level course is designed to help students become skilled readers and writers through engagement with the following course requirements:

  • Composing in several forms (e.g., narrative, compare and contrast, expository, analytical, and argumentative essays) based on students’ analyses of literary texts.  Papers:  approximately every 6 weeks
  • Discussing literature that is based on a careful observation of textual details, considering the work’s structure, style, and themes; the social and historical values it reflects and embodies; and such elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone
  • Reading complex imaginative literature
  • Writing that proceeds through several stages or drafts, with revision aided by teacher
  • Revising work to develop writing skills
    • A variety structures within paragraphs, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination
    • Step-by-step method of using color-coding to make it easier to stay-on-topic and provide ample support
    • Logical organization, enhanced by techniques such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis
    • A balance of generalization and specific, illustrative detail
    • An effective use of rhetoric, including tone, voice, diction, and sentence structure
  • Informal/exploratory writing activities that enable students to discover what they think in the process of writing about their reading (such assignments could include annotation, free writing, keeping a reading journal).

*Shakespeare OPTIONS:  Since Shakespeare intended audiences to be entertained by his plays rather than merely reading them, the intention of this course is to read in preparation for plays, to better comprehend the complex humor, play-on-words and human interaction.  Therefore options are available:

  • No Fear Shakespeare provides original text on the left-hand page, with an easy-to-understand translation on the right.  Choose which is best.  Many choose reading the original text–so they can follow along better while watching the DVD–but look across the page when wording is confusing.  Or you may choose
  • Tales from Shakespeare by Charles and Mary Lamb, written in 1807, reduces the archaic English and complicated story line of Shakespeare to a simple level that can be read and comprehended (approximately 15 page synopsis per play). However, as noted in the author’s Preface, “His words are used whenever it seemed possible to bring them in; and in whatever has been added to give them the regular form of a connected story, diligent care has been taken to select such words as might least interrupt the effect of the beautiful English tongue in which he wrote: therefore, words introduced into our language since his time have been as far as possible avoided.”  (I refer to this treasure every time I go to Shakespeare-in-the-Park!)

 

ECONOMICS—First Semester

Recommended by the Mises Institute, Lessons for the Young Economist by Robert P. Murphy, is considered by some as preparation for AP Economics exam or just “great economics for life.”

 Lessons for the Young Economist is easily the best introduction to economics because it covers both pure economic theory and also how markets work.

Robert Murphy has the right frame of mind and mastery of the subject matter to provide the best possible pedagogy. The logic is super clear. The organization is impeccable.  It prepares the student for both conventional economic studies in the future and provides the logical rigor and policy clarity that only the Austrian School perspective can offer.

Most of the attempts at such texts falter because they are either too dry and technical or they are littered with attempts to keep the student entertained with references to pop culture or cheesy passages that attempt to “speak the child’s language” but only end up sounding patronizing.

Dr. Murphy’s text has none of this. The prose has relentless fire without needless fireworks. What drives it forward is intellectual passion born of his love of the topic. What’s also nice is that he is nowhere self-consciously trying to sound like someone he is not. It is his real voice, explaining everything point by point. For this reason, the text is warm and engaging.

Here is the product of vast experience and daily writing. This permits the voicing of the book to achieve a remarkable integration page to page, chapter to chapter. Though he is drawing from the whole history of the development of economics, the text ends up being strikingly original. His approach is not based on anything but his own sense of how to teach this subject.

This book will not be boring or useless even for people who think they already know the subject. Every page or two, there are fresh insights.

It has a much larger market than just high-school students. Anyone can enjoy this book and learn from it. Any adult will love this book.

See lessons on syllabus or the following link.  Scroll to see the YouTube interview of the author.  https://mises.org/library/lessons-young-economist

 

GOVERNMENT–Second Semester–“Constitution 101 from Hillsdale College: The Meaning & History of the Constitution”

Hillsdale is launching the largest, most ambitious mass education campaign in the college’s history, to rescue our nation’s youth from our failed public educations system and to teach 100 million Americans about the urgent need to restore the Constitution.  Donations will be appreciated to receive a free copy of the textbook.

25-35 minute lectures on-line with assigned readings of primary source documents (25-30 pages) for 10 weeks.

Textbook, The U.S. Constitution, edited by the Hillsdale College Politics Faculty, a 790 page compilation of primary source documents which we will be reading through the year (free with donation)

See https://online.hillsdale.edu/course/con-101/lecture-1/lecture

Hillsdale College President, Larry P. Arnn, writes: “Our public education system has failed so miserably that millions of our young people are actually turning toward socialism and other failed political theories as acceptable forms of government.”

LECTURES (video or audio)

 

SAMPLE WEEK’S ASSIGNMENT

Lecture 4:  How Do Federal Agencies Evade the Constitution’s Separation of Powers? (26 minutes)

Readings from primary source documents (about 25-30 pages per week). Highlight & Annotate

Discussion Questions

  • What was the prevailing view of the form or shape that republican government should take prior to the American Founding?
  • Why must consent be structured in a certain way to bring about a just political result?
  • How does separation of powers work to prevent tyranny and foster good government?

 

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Homework:  10-12 hours per week

Tuition:  $105 per month (If you don’t need Economics or Government, adjustment will be made)

Material Fee:  $80 (copies, DVDs, NAS Bible)

Preregistration fee: $40

 

PREREQUISITES:

Do Hard Things by Harris and Harris (summer reading)

Strongly recommended:  2 hour “Writers’ Workshop” during the summer to learn color-coding, TBA

Personal Essay for the teacher to know something about you

A desire to learn

Assignments turned in on time

Not a distraction to others; the teacher is one of the others

 

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TEXTBOOKS REQUIRED:  About $200 before tax, S/H   (Please be sure your student has the same edition as the class so that he or she can follow along during lively class discussions)

A History Revealed:  Romans, Reformers, Revolutionaries by Diana Waring plus 3 sets of CDs.  Total is approximately $95  (CDs:  What in the World? True Tales, and Digging Deeper)

Lessons for the Young Economics, Robert Murphy, Amazon $25.00.  ISBN-10: 1933550880, ISBN-13: 978-1933550886

The U.S. Constitution, edited by the Hillsdale College Politics Faculty, ISBN 978-091630836-0   $40.00,  or free with a contribution to Hillsdale College.  Primary source documents http://www.constitutionreader.com/reader.engz?doc=constitution

Law & Gospel by Brandon Booth (order from Worldview Academy)                                                         $12

 Better Punctuation in 30 Minutes a Day, Ceil Cleveland, ISBN 978-1-56414-626-7                     $14

No Fear Shakespeare ($3 each at Half Price; $5.65 Amazon): Much Ado about Nothing, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Othello.

(or) Tales from Shakespeare by Charles & Mary Lamb, $8.95. ISBN-10: 1518758851;ISBN-13: 978-1518758850

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Supplies Needed:

Journal of student’s choosing

Spiral for notetaking

Blue and green colored pencils

1.5 or 2″ three-ring binder with notebook paper

Dividers

Pens or pencils

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Please feel free to call or text with any questions, to schedule a meeting, or to ask for references. 

Susanne Johnson

972-533-7601                                   

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Due Date

 

World History Economics English STUDENT  NOTES
Aug 22

Unit 1

 

Medieval; 1st-2nd Century Church; Plague; Constantine; the Canon

Phase 1:  Read & Listen. Consider a person or event for research

1. Thinking Like an Economist

 

Discuss Do Hard Things from summer reading  
Aug 29 Phase 2

Research & PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

2. How We Develop Economic Principles Free writing

 

 
Sept 5

 

 

Phase 3 or 4

Hands on OR Expression: Time line + choose one:  map, perform or bring music, artistic creation, or show slides of art of the time, puppetry, dance, graphic design, architecture, etc.

3. Economic Concepts Implied By Action

4.“Robinson Crusoe” Economics

Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare  
Sept 12

 

In class video:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

None (unless a student or 2 choose to bring food of the time period) Capitalism: The Market Economy

5. The Institution of Private Property

6. Direct Exchange and Barter Prices

Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due Date World History Economics English STUDENT  NOTES
Sept 19

Unit 2

 

Barbarians in Rome; Christianity Among the Goths; Huns & Saints

Phase 1: Read & Listen

Decide on a person or event that interests you

None Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare

(Watch Much Ado About Nothing in class)

 
Sept 26

 

Phase 2:  Research & PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes) 7. Indirect Exchange and the Appearance of Money

8. The Division of Labor and Specialization

Free writing  
Oct 3

 

In class video:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

Phase 3 or 4:  Hands on OR Expression: Time line + choose one:  map, perform music or bring music on phone, artistic creation, or show art of the time w/projector, puppetry, dance, graphic design, architecture, food, etc. 9. Entrepreneurship and

Competition

10. Income, Saving, and Investment

 

 

Writing assignment TBA  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World History Economics English STUDENT  NOTES
Oct 10

Unit 3

 

Byzantine; Justinian I, Mohammed; Islam Empire

Phase 1:  Read & Listen.

Decide on a person or event that interests you

None Begin Hamlet, Shakespeare  
Oct 17 Phase 2:  Research & PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes) 11. Supply and Demand

12. Interest, Credit, and Debt

Hamlet, William Shakespeare  
Oct 24

 

In class video:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

Phase 3 or 4:  Hands on OR Expression: Time line + choose one:  map, perform music or bring music on phone, artistic creation, or show art of the time w/projector, puppetry, dance, graphic design, architecture, food, etc. 13. Profit and Loss

14. The Stock Market

 

 

Hamlet, William Shakespeare  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

e Date World History Economics English STUDENT  NOTES
Oct 31

Unit 4

In Class DVD:  Cultivating Our Relationship with Christ

Charlemagne; Vikings; Feudalism; Holy Roman Empire; Western Politics.

Phase 1: Read & Listen.

Decide on a person or event that interests you

None Hamlet, William Shakespeare

 

(Watch Hamlet in class)

 
Nov 7 Phase 2:  Research & PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes) PART III: SOCIALISM: The Command Economy

 

15. The Failures of Socialism—Theory

16. The Failures of Socialism—History

 

Brainstorm/Rough draft  
Nov 14

 

In class video:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

Phase 3 or 4:  Hands on OR Expression: Time line + choose one:  map, perform music or bring music on phone, artistic creation, or show art of the time w/projector, puppetry, dance, graphic design, architecture, food, etc. PART IV INTERVENTIONISM: The Mixed Economy

17. Price Controls

18. Sales and Income Taxes; Government Spending

 

 

Final essay  
THANKSGIVING WEEK Phase 1 Chapter 19 – 20    

 

Due Date World History Economics English STUDENT  NOTES
Nov 28

Unit 5

Crusades; Mongols & Marco Polo; The Great Schism; Papal Power & Philosophy

Phase 1:  Read & Listen. Decide on a person or event that interests you

19. Tariffs and Quotas

20. The Economics of Drug Prohibition

 

 

Free Writing  
Dec 5 Phase 2

Research & PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

21. Inflation: How Governments Make Prices Rise

22. Government Debt and Future Generations

Brainstorm/Rough draft about economics  
Dec 12 Phase 3 or 4:  Hands on OR Expression: Time line + choose one 23. The Business Cycle; How Governments Cause the Business Cycle;

Causes of Mass Unemployment

FINAL

Read handout synopsis of Taming of the Shrew, William Shakespeare (Watch Taming of the Shrew in class.  It’s funny!)  
Christmas Break     Read Twelfth Night during Christmas holiday  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Semester

Year 2:  Middle (Romans, Reformers and Revolutionaries)

[email protected]viewsmatter.net

Due Date World History Government:  U. S. Constitution 101 English STUDENT  NOTES
Jan 9

Unit 6

Disintegration of Monarchy; Hundred Years’ War; Francis of Assisi & Fall of Constantinople

Phase 1:  Read & Listen

Choose Research Topic

None Twelfth Night, William Shakespeare

(Watch in class)

 

 

Jan 16 Phase 2

Research Presentation: PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

L 1–The American Founding: Revolutionary or Conservative? Journaling  
Jan 23

In class:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

Phase 3 or 4:

Hands on or Expression

L 2–The Theory of the Declaration and the Constitution

 

Othello by Shakespeare  
Jan 30 None L 3–The Problem of Majority Tyranny and the Necessity of Union

The Law & the Gospel, 4 pages

 

 

Othello by Shakespeare

 

 

 

 

Due Date World History Government:  U. S. Constitution 101 English STUDENT  NOTES
Feb 6

Unit 7

Renaissance; Reformation; Exploration & Politics

Phase 1:  Read & Listen

Choose Research Topic

The Law & the Gospel (4 pages) Othello by Shakespeare

(Watch in class)

 
Feb 13 Phase 2:

Research Presentation: PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

L 4–Consent of the Governed and the Separation of Powers

 

None  
Feb 20 Phase 3 or 4:

Hands on or Expression

L 5–To Secure These Rights: Economics, Religion, and Character

 

Rough Draft TBA  
Feb 27

In class:  How Should We Then Live, Frances Schaeffer

None L 6–Crisis of the Constitution: Slavery and Secession

 

Final draft  

 

 

 

 

Due Date World History Government:  U. S. Constitution 101 English STUDENT  NOTES
Mar 6

Unit 8

Elizabethan Age; Shakespeare; Galileo; Cromwell; Rembrandt; Isaac Newton

Phase 1: Read & Listen.  Decide on research topic

The Law & the Gospel, 4 pages    
Spring Break Easter Break Easter Break    
 

Mar 27

Phase 2

Research Presentation: PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

The Law & the Gospel, 4 pages

 

The Tempest by Shakespeare  
 

April 3

 

Phase 3 or 4 L 7–The Progressive Rejection of the Principles of the Declaration Writing Assignment TBA  

 

 

 

 

 

Due Date World History Government:  U. S. Constitution 101 English STUDENT   NOTES
April 17

Unit 9

Enlightenment; Revolutions; Great Awakening; U.S. Forefathers; Mozart

Phase 1: Read & Listen. Choose Topic

L 8–The Progressive Assault on the Constitution    
April 24 Phase 2:

Research Presentation: PowerPoint or Posters (5-10 minutes)

 

L 9–The Administrative State Today

 

The Law & the Gospel, 4 pages  
May 1

 

Phase 3 or 4 L 10–Modern Conservatism and the Constitution The Law & the Gospel, 8 pages  
 

May 8

  Government Final The Law & the Gospel, 8 pages